Skip to Main Content
Have library access? Log in through your library
Micro-foundations for Innovation Policy

Micro-foundations for Innovation Policy

B. Nooteboom
E. Stam
Series: WRR Rapporten
Copyright Date: 2008
Pages: 368
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46mwvr
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Micro-foundations for Innovation Policy
    Book Description:

    In economics, business, and government policy, innovation policy requires the creation of new approaches based on insight in what happens in innovation processes, on the micro level of people, firms and interaction between them. In innovation policy it should also be recognized that innovation entails a whole range of activities beyond R&D, such as entrepreneurship, design, commercialization, organization, collaboration and the diffusion of knowledge and innovations . This edited volume explores the roles of individuals and organizations involved in the creation and application of innovations. Covering topics as diverse as the macro-economic importance of innovation, theories of knowledge and learning, entrepreneurship, education and research, organizational innovation, networks and regional innovation systems, Micro-Foundations for Innovation Policy provides critical insights into the development of innovation policy. This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.

    eISBN: 978-90-485-0130-4
    Subjects: Political Science, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-10)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. 11-12)
    W.B.H.J. van de Donk
  4. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
    (pp. 13-14)
  5. CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. 15-16)
  6. 1 INNOVATION, THE ECONOMY, AND POLICY
    (pp. 17-52)
    Bart Nooteboom and Erik Stam

    Innovation has been essential for economic growth in the last centuries (Mokyr 1990; Baumol 2004). In western economies, the importance of innovation for economic growth has become more pressing given ageing populations, global competition, increasing product variety, and shortening product life cycles. Innovation is also needed to solve problems in society such as those concerning climate change, health, and congestion. Innovation also has intrinsic value as a manifestation of creativity. In this volume the focus is on the economic significance of innovation, and on its conditions, in innovation systems. The aim is to provide an analytical basis for innovation policy,...

  7. 2 INNOVATION AND MACROECONOMICS
    (pp. 53-74)
    Gerard de Vries

    The functioning of welfare states profits immensely from a fair measure of economic growth. It enables them to cope with structural changes of their economies and labour markets, to address new challenges such as those stemming from the ageing of the population and climatic changes, and to enact reforms to modernise its social arrangements. Furthermore, economic growth provides the means for realising the demands of the population for more economic progress and more welfare. Therefore, it is interesting to assess the extent to which innovation can contribute to the emergence of economic growth.

    Innovation is considered an important factor of...

  8. 3 LEARNING, DISCOVERY AND COLLABORATION
    (pp. 75-102)
    Bart Nooteboom

    In chapters 1 and 2 one conclusion was that for a foundation of innovation policy we need to move beyond macro analyses of factor productivity and into the innovation system, with micro-level analyses of actions and interactions of the actors involved, in the context of institutions and institutional change. r&d does not directly yield innovation, but a pool of ideas and emergent technologies, products, and practices, which require testing, design, commercialization, marketing, and the development of production. This requires entrepreneurship and organisation, internally within firms and externally, within networks of firms. r&d may also serve to explore new developments and...

  9. 4 RESEARCH, HIGHER EDUCATION, AND INNOVATION
    (pp. 103-134)
    Gerrit Kronjee and Bart Nooteboom

    In this chapter we discuss scientific research and higher education. New knowledge in the fields of science and technology often has a positive effect on the wealth of nations. Consider, for instance, the discovery of radar that after military applications turned out to also facilitate transportation. However, new knowledge may also have non-economic social consequences. When knowledge promotes the attainment of goals like safety, public health, or a clean environment, that also is part of innovation. Many scientists are particularly motivated by such societal goals.

    In this chapter we consider if and how innovation policy for scientific research and education...

  10. 5 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION
    (pp. 135-172)
    Erik Stam

    Entrepreneurship has been recognised as a micro-driver of innovation and economic growth (Wennekers and Thurik 1999; Audretsch and Thurik 2001b; Acs 2006; Audretsch et al. 2006). What is meant by entrepreneurship, innovation, and economic growth is often not clear or is very idiosyncratic. This chapter starts with a discussion of the nature of entrepreneurship and its relation to innovation. The second section provides an overview of theory and empirical research on the relation between entrepreneurship, innovation, and economic growth. The chapter continues with a study on entrepreneurship and innovation in the Netherlands from an international and historical perspective. After these...

  11. 6 BARRIERS TO INNOVATION
    (pp. 173-198)
    Leo van der Geest and Lars Heuts

    In all industrial countries governments embrace innovation as a source of future wealth. The European Union sees innovation as a key factor in its aim to become the most dynamic and competitive region in the world by 2010, as stated in its ‘Lisbon agenda’. In the Netherlands an ‘Innovation Platform’ has been established by the government, under the direct guidance of Prime Minister Balkenende, in 2003 to promote innovation in Dutch society.

    This is not surprising. Countless studies have led to the conclusion that innovation is the main source of productivity rise and wealth creation, not only nowadays, but throughout...

  12. 7 COLLABORATION, TRUST, AND THE STRUCTURE OF RELATIONSHIPS
    (pp. 199-218)
    Bart Nooteboom

    The literature on ‘open innovation’ and the analysis in chapter 3 recommend collaboration between organisations as a source of innovation. Dutch and eu innovation policy, on all spatial levels (regional, national, supra-national), have caught on to the trend of ‘open innovation’, in the stimulation and even organisation of collaboration, networks, and local ‘clusters’. However, collaboration is often risky and difficult, and frequently fails. So, we need to consider the governance of collaborative relationships.

    This, I propose, entails a shift in the notion of governance. Traditionally, concepts of governance have been oriented towards control. The World Bank defined governance as the...

  13. 8 INNOVATION AND ORGANISATION
    (pp. 219-248)
    Bart Nooteboom and Robert Went

    In this chapter we look at how to organise for innovation and how to innovate organisation.

    In a review of the existing literature on organisational innovation, Lam (2005) notes that “(t)here is no single coherent conceptual framework for understanding the phenomenon of ‘organisational innovation’. This is partly due to the great conceptual ambiguity and confusion surrounding the term organisational innovation.” To begin with, there is no consensus definition of the term organisational innovation. Lam holds that this conceptual indeterminacy may reflect the fact that organisational innovation embraces a very wide range of phenomena. She notes that “at present, research on...

  14. 9 INNOVATION AND CREATIVITY IN ORGANISATIONS: INDIVIDUAL AND WORK TEAM RESEARCH FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GOVERNMENT POLICY
    (pp. 249-272)
    Neil R. Anderson and Rosina M. Gasteiger

    Facing rapid technological changes and being challenged, for example by emerging markets, today’s organisations have to adapt quickly in order to maintain or, ideally, to increase their effectiveness. Within this scope the development and adoption of innovations have become a critical determinant of organisational productivity, competitiveness, and longevity. Hence, it is not surprising that a major research effort has focused on variables that facilitate or hinder the development and implementation of innovations (Howell and Higgins 1990). The aim and scope of the present chapter is to present an overview of existing research findings into innovation and creativity in the workplace...

  15. 10 INTER-ORGANISATIONAL NETWORKS AND INNOVATION
    (pp. 273-314)
    Marius T.H. Meeus, Leon A.G. Oerlemans and Patrick Kenis

    In different scientific fields (e.g., organisation and business studies, economics), and in policy practice, there is growing attention for the importance of interorganisational relationships (IORs) and networks (IONs). Central issues are the functioning and performance of the business community in general, and the relationship between iors and ions for the innovative behaviour of organisations in particular. It is believed that having iors and being part of ions is beneficial to innovation. However, reviews that have been done so far, predominantly focus on the effects of so-called dyads on innovation (i.e., the iors between two organisations) (Pittaway et al. 2004), whereas...

  16. 11 REGIONAL INNOVATION POLICY
    (pp. 315-342)
    Ron Boschma

    Why some regions grow more than other regions is a key question in economic geography. Up until the late 1980s, neo-classical economic approaches argued that technology is a key determinant of regional growth. However, these approaches treated technology as an exogenous factor, leaving the geography of innovation unexplained. Inspired by Schumpeter, economic geographers took the lead in criticising this view. Since the early 1980s, they have focused attention on the explanation of the geography of innovation: some regions are more capable of developing and implementing innovations, and region-specific characteristics (including institutions) may be underlying forces. This led to the claim...

  17. 12 CONCLUSIONS FOR INNOVATION POLICY: OPENING IN FOURS
    (pp. 343-368)
    Bart Nooteboom and Erik Stam

    Innovation is needed to sustain economic growth, but the position of the Netherlands in terms of innovation is not a very good one. It was shown in chapter 2 that in recent years the eu has lagged behind the us in productivity growth, and within the eu the Netherlands takes up a middle position. The Netherlands performs below the eu average in six out of eight indicators of innovativeness. It was shown in chapter 5 that although in recent years the number of new firms has risen rather spectacularly, this can largely be attributed to employees continuing their activities in...