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Infrastructures

Infrastructures: Time to Invest

WRR
Series: WRR Rapporten
Copyright Date: 2008
Pages: 224
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46n04c
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  • Book Info
    Infrastructures
    Book Description:

    Modern societies cannot exist without roads, dams, drinking water, telephone networks and electricity. The recent decades of privatization and globalization have put infrastructural providers at a distance from the influence of government. A lot of the actors in this field no longer act on a regional or national level alone, but are simultaneously active on multiple levels. The essays in this timely book consider the various intersections of public interest, strategic activity and private equity from economic, legal, administrative and technical perspectives. The contributors outline the challenges which future governments will need to meet nationally and globally, such as climate change, reduction of CO2 emissions and global capital flows, to name but a few. This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.

    eISBN: 978-90-485-0131-1
    Subjects: Political Science, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-6)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 7-10)
  3. SUMMARY IN DUTCH
    (pp. 11-34)

    In het politieke debat, in de kranten en op straat zijn heel wat zorgen te beluisteren over de staat van de Nederlandse infrastructuren. Het zijn zorgen over treinen die niet op tijd rijden, prijzen die alsmaar stijgen, energievoorziening die uitvalt en dijken die het dreigen te begeven. Al gauw wordt dan een verband gelegd met de liberalisering en privatisering die in de afgelopen vijftien tot twintig jaar hun intrede hebben gedaan in al onze infrastructuren. De marktwerking, zo valt overal, ook onder parlementariërs, te beluisteren, moet worden teruggedraaid en de overheid zou weer volledige zeggenschap moeten hebben over wat ‘van...

  4. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
    (pp. 35-46)

    Drinking water supply, mobility, communications and energy are critical for the functioning of contemporary society. Without these services all modern societies would collapse, as major energy blackouts and train accidents often remind us. Equally indispensable are the infrastructures that enable the protection against flooding, that facilitate electronic communications and transport by road, rail and air.

    The efficiency of the entire economy is heavily influenced by the effectiveness, quality and universality of these infrastructures. They are priority factors in locational decisions for investment by firms in many industries. The effects of efficiency and universality ripple throughout the economy and society in...

  5. Preface
    (pp. 47-48)
  6. 1 INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 49-70)

    Drinking water supply, mobility, communications and energy are critical to the functioning of contemporary society. Without these services all modern societies would collapse, as major energy blackouts and train accidents often remind us. Equally indispensable are the infrastructures that enable the protection against flooding, that facilitate electronic communications and transport by road, rail and air.

    The efficiency of the entire economy is heavily influenced by the effectiveness, quality and universality of these infrastructures. They are priority factors in locational decisions for investment by firms in many industries. The effects of efficiency and universality ripple throughout the economy and society in...

  7. 2 REGIME CHANGE AND INVESTMENT IN INFRASTRUCTURES
    (pp. 71-88)

    As the previous chapter described, infrastructures are critical for the functioning of modern society as well as the key to successful social change such as, for instance, a transition to a low-carbon sustainable future for most of the world’s economies. In the context of a multitude of discrete and autonomous transactions in relation to infrastructures involving both heterogeneous actors and principals at multiple levels or arenas, hybrid constellations of public and private actors and technological developments, critical infrastructures have become ‘systems of systems’ (Sajeva 2006; Larouche 2008).

    The first stage of regime change focused on ‘Type I’ market failures, which...

  8. 3 A NEW CONSTELLATION OF ACTORS
    (pp. 89-104)

    Concerns have recently been raised on the negative aspects of private involvement in infrastructures, a discourse for which the rise of private equity funds, foreign actors and discussions on the – possible – transfer of ownership into private hands provide the new context. More generally, the desirability of the private actors’ involvement in infrastructures has become an ever more probing issue in political debates. There is no doubt that many new actors have come to the fore, albeit that differences between infrastructures are substantial. It would be too simplistic, however, to limit the effects of regime change on the actor...

  9. 4 INFRASTRUCTURES IN A MULTI-LEVEL ARENA
    (pp. 105-122)

    This chapter analyses increasing internationalisation as a second change to the organisation as well as the delivery of public values within the infrastructure. In chapter 2, we examined the impact of regime change and analysed how public values in infrastructure provision had come under pressure from private sector involvement and with it, a blurring of the dividing line between public and private values, undermining the ‘public-ness’ of infrastructures. The second relevant challenge is that of the increasing involvement of ‘levels’ other than the national. Together, these two challenges may lead to the hypothesis that national authorities are merelyoneof...

  10. 5 REGIME CHANGE AND PUBLIC VALUES IN INFRASTRUCTURES
    (pp. 123-140)

    Infrastructures are the precondition for the delivery of services that are indispensable to modern societies, e.g., services such as drinking water supply, the provision of electricity, data communication and flood control. But the significance of infrastructures for society goes beyond the delivery of services. As Van der Woud’s study (2006) has shown, infrastructures have been the prerequisite for economic, social and cultural development in societies. Infrastructures serve a wide array of public interests and values; from sustainability; public health, safety and reliability; affordability and many more. The relation between these public values and the investment in infrastructures is evident. Since...

  11. 6 Regime change and the investment in energy infrastructure
    (pp. 141-174)

    This case study will apply the analysis developed in the previous chapters, to examine how investment decisions in infrastructures in the Dutch electricity and gas sectors have been affected by regime change thus far, and consider the likely impact of new exogenous factors on energy infrastructure development. The aim is to highlight the issues in one particular sector in which the process of regime change is relatively advanced.

    Two sets of European directives were aimed at creating an internal market for electricity and gas within the European Union. Investments in infrastructures at the national level were not dealt with at...

  12. 7 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
    (pp. 175-200)

    This report has established that the role which infrastructural provision must play in the future requires a new perspective which recognises their core, strategic role in facilitating wider economic and societal change. Among the future challenges that require vast investments are the transition to sustainable mobility, a knowledge-based economy as well as a low-carbon economy – all of the revised Lisbon agenda goals. These goals show that the infrastructures involved are not just important for the delivery of services such as gas, electricity, drinking water, transport or electronic communications. Infrastructures are increasingly pivotal for facilitating change and as such, in...

  13. ANNEX CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURES: AN INDICATIVE INVENTORY
    (pp. 201-204)
  14. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. 205-208)
  15. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 209-218)
  16. Back Matter
    (pp. 219-224)