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Making Migration Work: The Future of Labour Migration in the European Union

Jan Willem Holtslag
Monique Kremer
Erik Schrijvers
Series: WRR Rapporten
Copyright Date: 2013
Pages: 126
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt46n2nh
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  • Book Info
    Making Migration Work
    Book Description:

    The complexion of labour migration in the European Union (EU) has altered in recent years. Not only has there been a shift in the length of time labour migrants spend abroad, but the nature, scale and direction of the migration flows have also changed dramatically. The enlargements of the EU in 2004 and 2007 were influential in this respect. A growing economy and large wage gaps encouraged a large stream of workers to leave the new Member States for the old. The EU's open internal borders made it easy for them to return home or to move on to another Member State. This publication considers what this means for the future of labour migration and how policy should address this issue. This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.

    eISBN: 978-90-485-1951-4
    Subjects: Political Science, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. 1-4)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. 5-6)
  3. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 7-10)
    J.A. Knottnerus

    The complexion of labour migration in the European Union (EU) has altered in recent years. Not only has there been a shift in the length of time labour migrants spend abroad, but the nature, scale and direction of the migration flows have also changed dramatically. The enlargements of the EU in 2004 and 2007 were influential in this respect. A growing economy and large wage gaps encouraged a large stream of workers to leave the new Member States for the old. The EU’s open internal borders made it easy for them to return home or to move on to another...

  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. 11-12)
  5. 1 HOW TO MAKE MIGRATION WORK
    (pp. 13-38)
    Monique Kremer, Erik Schrijvers and Jan Willem Holtslag

    Labour migration has become inevitable in a Europe without frontiers. In fact, one of the explicit aims of the European Union Member States is to promote the free movement of workers in addition to the free movement of commerce and goods. The underlying idea is that labour shortages in one country can be offset by unemployed workers from other countries. Besides preventing unemployment, an open European labour market also improves economic resilience and allows European regions to specialise, making the European Union more competitive as a whole.

    Compared to the United States or Canada, internal mobility in the European Union...

  6. 2 THE GLOBAL AND EUROPEAN NEIGHBOURHOOD MIGRATION SYSTEMS: TRENDS, POLICY CHOICES, GOVERNANCE CHALLENGES AND A LOOK AHEAD
    (pp. 39-50)
    Demetrios G. Papademetriou

    International migration, a key by-product of globalisation, is already one of this century’s unavoidable issues. It is here, it is going to stay and it is going to grow larger. Moreover, it will only become more unavoidable as the century progresses. Though few issues seem to be pricklier for high-income countries, good management of migrationispossible. It is managed with varying degrees of success all across high-income countries. However, it requires something that most countries are not particularly good at: the ability to think and act across the whole of government. And when it comes to integration issues, it...

  7. 3 SATISFYING LABOUR NEEDS IN AN AGEING SOCIETY
    (pp. 51-68)
    Georges Lemaître

    The demographic change that is underway in almost all OECD countries – the retirement of the large baby boom cohorts and their replacement by smaller youth cohorts – has many policymakers concerned. Governments are accustomed to dealing with economic growth in the context of demographic expansion, but addressing demographic contraction seems like a different game. There are fears among national and international policymakers (European Commission 2009) that there will not be enough workers or enough of the right kinds of workers to replace those who will be retiring. Implicit in these fears is the belief that demand will persist and that even...

  8. 4 MIGRANT WORKERS: INEVITABILITY OR POLICY CHOICE?
    (pp. 69-82)
    Martin Ruhs and Bridget Anderson

    The regulation of labour immigration is one of the most important and controversial public policy issues in high-income countries. Many states in Europe and North America have experienced rapid increases in labour immigration over the past 20 years. The current global economic downturn has added further momentum to what in many countries were already highly charged debates about the impacts of rising numbers of migrants on the economic prospects of citizens and on the host economy and society more generally. A survey by theFinancial Timesin March 2009 showed that over three quarters of adults in Italy and the...

  9. 5 INTRA-EU LABOUR MOBILITY AFTER EASTERN ENLARGEMENT AND DURING THE CRISIS: MAIN TRENDS AND CONTROVERSIES
    (pp. 83-104)
    Béla Galgóczi and Janine Leschke

    The accession of eight new Central and Eastern European countries (EU8)² to the EU in May 2004 and the subsequent accession of Romania and Bulgaria in January 2007 (EU2) marked an important step in the history of European integration. It reunited a continent divided since the Second World War. An important consequence was the extension of the free movement of capital, goods, services and people to Central and Eastern Europe. European law guarantees these freedoms within the EU – in principle. However, in light of the large differences in wages, for example, there were fears of a massive influx of workers...

  10. 6 LABOUR MIGRATION FROM CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR INTEGRATION POLICY
    (pp. 105-122)
    Godfried Engbersen

    The European Union’s enlargement in 2004 and 2007 was one of the most important political innovations of the early twenty-first century. The accession often new Member States led to a considerable increase in labour migration. Millions of Central and Eastern Europeans went to Western Europe for work. The scale of these migration flows was unanticipated (Black et al. 2010). That was true of the migration flows to the Netherlands too. According to estimates, between 260,000 and 305,000 Central and Eastern Europeans were living in the Netherlands in 2008 (Van der Heijden et al. 2011). These estimates include Central and Eastern...

  11. ABOUT THE AUTHORS
    (pp. 123-126)