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Saints and Sinners

Saints and Sinners: A History of the Popes; Second Edition

Eamon Duffy
Copyright Date: 2006
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 496
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5vkscs
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  • Book Info
    Saints and Sinners
    Book Description:

    This abundantly illustrated book encompasses the extraordinary history of the papacy, from its beginnings nearly two thousand years ago to the reign of Pope John Paul II."Duffy offers a comprehensive overview of the 2,000-year history of the papacy. . . . This digestible survey provides a compelling introduction to one of the most durable and significant institutions to influence the course of Western civilization."-Booklist"As [Duffy] works his way through the papal roll of honour and dishonour, he is always careful to re-create the political, social and economic background to different reigns. He eschews opaque ecclesiastical jargon and, where a theological or doctrinal dispute has to be explained, he does so in a way that even those unversed in biblical concepts or Christian history will immediately grasp. . . . [An] outstanding work of popular scholarship."-Peter Stanford,The Daily Telegraph

    eISBN: 978-0-300-17503-5
    Subjects: Religion

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION
    (pp. ix-x)
    Eamon Duffy
  5. PREFACE
    (pp. xi-xiv)
    Eamon Duffy
  6. CHAPTER ONE ‘UPON THIS ROCK’ c. AD 33–461
    (pp. 1-47)

    Round the dome of St Peter’s basilica in Rome, in letters six feet high, are Christ’s words to Peter from chapter sixteen of Matthew’s Gospel:Tu es Petrus, et super hanc petram aedificabo ecclesiam meam et tibi dabo claves regni caelorum(Thou art Peter, and upon this Rock I will build my Church and I will give to thee the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven). Set there to crown the grave of the Apostle, hidden far below the high altar, they are also designed to proclaim the authority of the man whom almost a billion Christians look to as...

  7. CHAPTER TWO BETWEEN TWO EMPIRES 461–1000
    (pp. 48-109)

    In the year 476 the last Emperor of the West was deposed by the Germanic General Odoacer the Rugian, and Italy became a barbarian kingdom. The change from empire to kingdom, from toga to trousers, however, was to take generations to make its full imaginative impact. The barbarian kings of Italy pursued their own interests, but they ruled, to begin with at least, in the name of the distant Emperor in Constantinople, maintaining and honouring the Roman Senate, and accepting the honorific title ‘Patrician of the Romans’. Even Odoacer’s ferocious successor Theoderic, a man who could sign his own name...

  8. CHAPTER THREE SET ABOVE NATIONS 1000–1447
    (pp. 110-176)

    At the opening of the eleventh century the papacy was a contradictory mixture of exalted theory and squalid reality. In theory the bishops of Rome were lords of the world, exercising a unique spiritual supremacy symbolised by their exclusive right to anoint the western or ‘Holy Roman’ Emperor. In practice, the popes were strictly and often humiliatingly subordinated to the power of the local Roman aristocracy, or to the German ruling house. Of the twenty-five popes between 955 and 1057, thirteen were appointed by the local aristocracy, while the other twelve were appointed (and no fewer than five dismissed) by...

  9. CHAPTER FOUR PROTEST AND DIVISION 1447–1774
    (pp. 177-246)

    The Renaissance papacy evokes images of a Hollywood spectacular, all decadence and drag. Contemporaries viewed Renaissance Rome as we now view Nixon’s Washington, a city of expense-account whores and political graft, where everything and everyone had a price, where nothing and nobody could be trusted. The popes themselves seemed to set the tone. Alexander VI (1492–1503) flaunted a young and nubile mistress in the Vatican, was widely believed to have made a habit of poisoning his cardinals so as to get his hands on their property, and he ruthlessly aggrandised his illegitimate sons and daughters at the Church’s expense....

  10. CHAPTER FIVE THE POPE AND THE PEOPLE 1774–1903
    (pp. 247-318)

    By the 1780s, every Catholic state in Europe wanted to reduce the Pope to a ceremonial figurehead, and most had succeeded. Kings and princes appointed bishops and abbots, dictated which feast days would be observed and which ignored, policed or prevented appeals to Rome, vetted the publication of papal utterances. This was a theological as well as a political phenomenon. Under the influence of Jansenism and a growing Catholic interest in the early Church many theologians emphasised the supremacy of the bishop in the local church. The Pope was primate, and the final resort in doctrinal disputes, but papal intervention...

  11. CHAPTER SIX THE ORACLES OF GOD 1903–2005
    (pp. 319-396)

    At the end of the nineteenth century, the fortunes of the papacy seemed at an all time low. The Pope was beleaguered and landless, the Prisoner of the Vatican. But, as if in compensation, his spiritual role and symbolic power had grown to dizzying heights. The Pope was infallible, the unquestioned head and heart of the greatest of the Christian churches, spiritual father of millions of human beings, revered from Asia to the Americas as the oracle of God.

    In the nineteenth century, the popes had used their oracular powers to denounce secular thought, to present a siege mentality Catholicism...

  12. APPENDIX A: CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF POPES AND ANTIPOPES
    (pp. 397-405)
  13. APPENDIX B: GLOSSARY
    (pp. 406-414)
  14. APPENDIX C: HOW A NEW POPE IS MADE
    (pp. 415-420)
  15. NOTES
    (pp. 421-427)
  16. BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY
    (pp. 428-455)
  17. INDEX
    (pp. 456-474)