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Westerly

Westerly

WILL SCHUTT
Foreword by Carl Phillips
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: Yale University Press
Pages: 80
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt5vm2kp
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  • Book Info
    Westerly
    Book Description:

    A young soldier dons Napoleon's hat. An out-of-work man wanders Berlin, dreaming he is Peter the Great. The famous exile Dante finally returns to his native city to "hang his crown of laurels up." Familial and historical apparitions haunt this dazzling collection of poems by Will Schutt, the 2012 recipient of the prestigious Yale Series of Younger Poets award.

    Coupled with Schutt's own voice are the voices of some of Italy's most prominent nineteenth- and twentieth-century poets including Giacomo Leopardi, Alda Merini, Eugenio Montale, and Edoardo Sanguineti. Subtle, discerning, restrained, the poems inWesterlyprobe a vast emotional geography, with its contingent pleasures and pains, "where the door's always dark, the sky still blue."

    …some narrow sickness buried you.

    Whatever boyhood I had

    fate hijacked too. Old friend, is this that

    world we stayed awake all night for?

    Truth dropped in. Far off,

    your cool hand points the way.

    eISBN: 978-0-300-18981-0
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Foreword
    (pp. ix-xiv)
    Carl Phillips

    Westerly. The word has a doubleness to it, meaning bothtowardthe west, andfromthat direction. The west, of course, as also the land of the dead in many traditions—Christian, Homeric, Sumerian among them. Will Schutt’sWesterlytakes on nothing less than—on one hand—the ways in which we the living, both late and soon, make our stumbling way westward, mostly oblivious to the fact of mortality, like the summer people in the book’s opening poem; having weathered a storm, they

    walked their drinks down

    to the beach—the happy human chain—

    each tethered to one spot,...

  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  5. We Didn’t Start the Fire
    (pp. 3-3)
  6. Golden State Sublet
    (pp. 4-6)
  7. Fragment from a Coptic Tunic
    (pp. 7-7)
  8. Transparent Window on a Complex View
    (pp. 8-8)
  9. Beach Lane
    (pp. 9-9)
  10. Wild Hogs
    (pp. 10-10)
  11. From a Middle Distance
    (pp. 11-12)
  12. Forgetting Waukesha, Remembering St. Helena
    (pp. 13-13)
  13. Postcard of Peter Lorre Embracing Lotte Lenya, 1929
    (pp. 14-14)
  14. Flywheel with Variable Inertia
    (pp. 15-17)
  15. American Window Dressing
    (pp. 18-19)
  16. Rock Maple, White Pine
    (pp. 20-26)
  17. Hunchback FROM THE ITALIAN OF ALDA MERINI
    (pp. 29-29)
  18. “what do you do?” FROM THE ITALIAN OF EDOARDO SANGUINETI
    (pp. 30-30)
  19. “I taught my sons” FROM THE ITALIAN OF EDOARDO SANGUINETI
    (pp. 31-31)
  20. “one writes especially” FROM THE ITALIAN OF EDOARDO SANGUINETI
    (pp. 32-32)
  21. Rain FROM THE ITALIAN OF EUGENIO MONTALE
    (pp. 33-36)
  22. Westerly
    (pp. 39-40)
  23. Beauty Spot
    (pp. 41-41)
  24. Dante’s House
    (pp. 42-42)
  25. Crenellated Playroom
    (pp. 43-47)
  26. Strange Giraffe
    (pp. 48-48)
  27. A Kind of Poetry
    (pp. 49-49)
  28. The Farther Veil
    (pp. 50-51)
  29. Breughel in Rome
    (pp. 52-52)

    For the first few days, he picked fights with the cardinals. “What have you done with the farm girls, the fatboys straddling wine casks?” He tried explaining beauty. “Putti come to life,” he said, “if you just break their wings.” He packed the Tempietto with riffraff. After a while, he threw up his arms. The cardinals went away, convinced they’d met another Franciscan. Up late sobbing on the phone: “How did I end up here? Where are the girls who get around on ice skates?” When he finally left, he made the driver draw the curtains in his carriage. “So...

  30. Apparitions and Incarnations
    (pp. 53-53)
  31. Louise’s Story
    (pp. 54-54)
  32. Elba Journal
    (pp. 55-55)
  33. After A Silvia
    (pp. 56-58)
  34. Notes
    (pp. 59-60)