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Making Modern Muslims

Making Modern Muslims: The Politics of Islamic Education in Southeast Asia

Edited by Robert W. Hefner
Copyright Date: 2009
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt6wqvz8
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  • Book Info
    Making Modern Muslims
    Book Description:

    When students from a Muslim boarding school were convicted for the 2002 terrorist bombings in Bali, Islamic schools in Southeast Asia became the focus of intense international scrutiny. Some analysts have warned that these schools are being turned into platforms for violent jihadism. Making Modern Muslims is the first book to look comparatively at Islamic education and politics in Southeast Asia. Based on a two-year research project by leading scholars of Southeast Asian Islam, the book examines Islamic schooling in Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Cambodia, and the southern Philippines. The studies demonstrate that the great majority of schools have nothing to do with violence but are undergoing changes that have far-reaching implications for democracy, gender relations, pluralism, and citizenship. Making Modern Muslims offers an important reassessment of Muslim culture and politics in Southeast Asia and provides insights into the changing nature of state-society relations from the late colonial period to the present. It allows us to better appreciate the astonishing dynamism of Islamization in Southeast Asia and the struggle for Muslim hearts and minds taking place today. Timely and readable, this volume will be of great interest to teachers and specialists of Islam and Southeast Asia as well as the general reader seeking to understand the great transformations at work in the Muslim world.

    eISBN: 978-0-8248-6346-3
    Subjects: Political Science, Sociology

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. vii-viii)
    ROBERT W. HEFNER
  4. A NOTE ON SPELLING AND TRANSLITERATION
    (pp. ix-ix)
  5. 1 INTRODUCTION: THE POLITICS AND CULTURES OF ISLAMIC EDUCATION IN SOUTHEAST ASIA
    (pp. 1-54)
    ROBERT W. HEFNER

    Since the 9/11 attacks in the United States and the October 2002 Bali bombings in Indonesia, Islamic schools in Southeast Asia have been the focus of international attention. The young men responsible for the Bali attack, in which more than two hundred people died, had been students at an Islamic boarding school in East Java and had ties to the al-Mukmin boarding school in Central Java. Al-Mukmin is the home of Abu Bakar Ba‘asyir, a senior Islamic scholar who is alleged to have been the spiritual leader of the Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), an underground organization that has engaged in a...

  6. 2 ISLAMIC SCHOOLS, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS, AND DEMOCRACY IN INDONESIA
    (pp. 55-105)
    ROBERT W. HEFNER

    Events in the early 2000s cast a pall over Indonesia’s 47,000 Islamic schools. Just a few years earlier, in the late 1980s, the state Islamic university system had initiated curricular reforms that transformed it into one of the most forward-looking in the entire Muslim world.¹ In the 1990s, students and faculty from the same system played a proud role in Indonesia’s democracy movement, one of the largest the Muslim world has ever seen.² Following the collapse of President Soeharto’s “New Order” regime (1966–May 1998), however, radical Islamist paramilitaries (laskar) with ties to conservative Islamist boarding schools (pesantren) sprang up...

  7. 3 REFORMING ISLAMIC EDUCATION IN MALAYSIA DOCTRINE OR DIALOGUE?
    (pp. 106-140)
    RICHARD G. KRAINCE

    In June 2001, more than three months before the September 11 attacks on the United States, Malaysian police began warning citizens of a “jihad-based militant outfit” that they claimed was responsible for a string of violent crimes in Malaysia.¹ The capture of four men during a failed bank heist outside the nation’s capital of Kuala Lumpur the previous month led investigators to a cache of illegal weapons that included hand grenades, an M-16 assault rifle, ammunition, and chemicals assumed to be for making bombs. With information from those apprehended, detective units began to identify a widening circle of suspects believed...

  8. 4 ISLAMIC EDUCATION IN SOUTHERN THAILAND: NEGOTIATING ISLAM, IDENTITY, AND MODERNITY
    (pp. 141-171)
    JOSEPH CHINYONG LIOW

    Since January 2004, southern Thailand has been rocked by a sustained cycle of violence primarily, but not exclusively, targeted at extensions of the central state in the Malay-Muslim provinces. Investigations by state agencies and independent analysts have apparently uncovered several trails that have led to Islamic schools in the south. The more prominent cases include the arrest of Maisuri Haji Abdullah, aTok Guru(traditional Islamic teacher) of an Islamic school in Narathiwat in June 2003 on charges of being a member of Jemaah Islamiyah (JI) and plotting to bomb Western embassies in Bangkok; the involvement of students from the...

  9. 5 MUSLIM METAMORPHOSIS: ISLAMIC EDUCATION AND POLITICS IN CONTEMPORARY CAMBODIA
    (pp. 172-204)
    BJØRN ATLE BLENGSLI

    In May 2003 Riduan Isamuddin, better known as Hambali, was arrested in Ajutthaya, Thailand. The police accused him of masterminding the terrorist attack in Bali in October 2002 and directing a Southeast Asian affiliate of al-Qa‘ida, the Jemaah Islamiyah (JI). According to a U.S. FBI report dated February 25, 2004, Hambali entered Cambodia in September 2002 and left in February 2003. This disclosure quickly led to the arrest and trial of a number of foreign Muslims. Eventually, twenty-eight teachers at a school in Kandal province, financed and operated by the Saudi charity Umm al-Qura, were expelled from Cambodia.¹ Hambali and...

  10. 6 ISLAMIC EDUCATION IN THE PHILIPPINES: POLITICAL SEPARATISM AND RELIGIOUS PRAGMATISM
    (pp. 205-236)
    THOMAS M. MCKENNA and ESMAEL A. ABDULA

    The armed separatist conflict that has continued at various levels of intensity in the Muslim Philippines for almost thirty-five years exploded into extraordinary violence and animosity in the first years of this century. In May 2000, Philippines President Joseph Estrada launched a massive offensive against the largest Muslim separatist group, vowing “an all-out war”¹ against them. The offensive—the largest escalation of the armed conflict in more than fifteen years—captured the main rebel camp and created hundreds of thousands of Muslim refugees, but it did not accomplish its main goal. It did result in an unprecedented terror bombing campaign...

  11. List of Contributors
    (pp. 237-238)
  12. INDEX
    (pp. 239-246)