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The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Retirement Series: Volume 8: 1 October 1814 to 31 August 1815

The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Retirement Series: Volume 8: 1 October 1814 to 31 August 1815

J. JEFFERSON LOONEY EDITOR
ROBERT F. HAGGARD SENIOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR
JULIE L. LAUTENSCHLAGER ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ELLEN C. HICKMAN
CHRISTINE STERNBERG PATRICK
LISA A. FRANCAVILLA MANAGING EDITOR
ANDREA R. GRAY
PAULA VITERBO
CATHERINE COINER CRITTENDEN
SUSAN SPENGLER
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7scjs
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  • Book Info
    The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Retirement Series: Volume 8: 1 October 1814 to 31 August 1815
    Book Description:

    Volume Eight of the project documenting Thomas Jefferson's last years presents 591 documents dated from 1 October 1814 to 31 August 1815. Jefferson is overjoyed by American victories late in the War of 1812 and highly interested in the treaty negotiations that ultimately end the conflict. Following Congress's decision to purchase his library, he oversees the counting, packing, and transportation of his books to Washington. Jefferson uses most of the funds from the sale to pay old debts but spends some of the proceeds on new titles. He resigns from the presidency of the American Philosophical Society, revises draft chapters of Louis H. Girardin's history of Virginia, and advises William Wirt on revolutionary-era Stamp Act resolutions. Jefferson criticizes those who discuss politics from the pulpit, and he drafts a bill to transform the Albemarle Academy into Central College. Monticello visitors Francis W. Gilmer, Francis C. Gray, and George Ticknor describe the mountaintop and its inhabitants, and Gray's visit leads to an exchange with Jefferson about how many generations of white interbreeding it takes to clear Negro blood. Finally, although death takes his nephew Peter Carr and brother Randolph Jefferson, the marriage of his grandson Thomas Jefferson Randolph is a continuing source of great happiness.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-4004-5
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. FOREWORD
    (pp. vii-viii)

    The 591 documents in this volume cover the period from 1 October 1814 to 31 August 1815. As usual, Thomas Jefferson both followed closely the events of the day and attended diligently to the needs of his farms, friends, and family. He was overjoyed by American victories on land and at sea during the last year of the War of 1812, optimistic about the nation’s prospects, and highly interested in the negotiations leading to the Treaty of Ghent that closed the contest. Napoleon’s return to power in France early in 1815 and defeat at the Battle of Waterloo in June...

  2. EDITORIAL METHOD AND APPARATUS
    (pp. xi-xxiv)
  3. 1814
    (pp. 3-176)

    Dear Sir—

    I have a library of books which I should be glad to sell. It consists of about 5000 volumes, selected with care and caution. Various projects had occured to me to effect this object, but none has appeared free of objection. One feels awkwardly¹ to be hawking his commodities about streets, and to send such a quantity of books to auction and hire a master of the arts, which there succeed to puff them off with the prevalent common-place slang, seems not quite consistent with those delicate feelings which should govern high-minded men. At the same time, the...

  4. 1815
    (pp. 176-698)

    Dear Sir

    Your letters of Nov. 30. & Dec. 21. have been recieved with great pleasure. a truth now and then projecting into the ocean of Newspaper lies, serves like headlands to correct our course. indeed my scepticism as to every thing I see in a newspaper makes me indifferent whether I ever see one. the embarrasments at Washington in August last, I expected would be great in any state of things; but they proved greater than expected. I never doubted that the plans of the President were wise and sufficient. their failure we all impute 1. to the insubordinate...

  5. Appendix: Supplemental List of Documents Not Found
    (pp. 699-700)