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Heinrich Zimmer

Heinrich Zimmer: Coming into His Own

Margaret H. Case Editor
Copyright Date: 1994
Pages: 156
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7ztn2c
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    Heinrich Zimmer
    Book Description:

    Heinrich Zimmer (1890-1943) is best known in the English-speaking world for the four posthumous books edited by Joseph Campbell and published in the Bollingen Series:Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilization, Philosophies of India, The Art of Indian Asia,andThe King and the Corpse.These works have inspired several generations of students of Indian religion and culture.

    All the papers in this volume testify to Zimmer's originality and to his rightful place in that small group of great scholars who were part of the first generation to confront the end of European empires in India and the rest of Asia. In her introduction, Margaret Case contrasts Zimmer's approach to India with that of Jung. There follow two recollections of Zimmer, one by his daughter Maya Rauch, the other by a close friend and supporter in Germany, Herbert Nette. Then William McGuire describes Zimmer's connections with Mary and Paul Mellon and with the Jungian circles in Switzerland and New York. A brief talk by Zimmer, previously unpublished, describes his admiration for Jung. Wendy Doniger picks up the question of Zimmer's intellectual legacy, especially in the light of Campbell's editorial work on his English publications. Gerald Chapple raises another question about how his influence was felt: the division between what is known of his work in the German-and the English-speaking worlds. Kenneth Zysk then summarizes and analyzes his contribution to Western knowledge of Hindu medicine; Matthew Kapstein evaluates his place in the West's appreciation of Indian philosophy; and Mary Linda discusses his contributions to the study of Indian art in the light of A. K. Coomaraswamy's work and more recent research.

    Originally published in 1994.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-6376-1
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. vii-2)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 3-14)
    Margaret H. Case

    THIS VOLUME has grown out of a conference held on December 6, 1990 that marked the hundredth anniversary of Heinrich Zimmer’s birth.¹ Zimmer’s works in English—Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilization, Philosophies of India, The Art of Indian Asia, The King and the Corpse, Artistic Form and Yoga in the Sacred Images of India—have inspired several generations of students of Indian religion and culture. Zimmer wrote about India with a feeling and an understanding rarely found among Western scholars. It is those qualities that attract first-time readers, and that continue to inspire even those who quarrel...

  5. 1 HEINRICH ZIMMER FROM A DAUGHTER’S PERSPECTIVE
    (pp. 15-20)
    Maya Rauch

    I LAST SAW my father when I was fourteen years old, in 1939. He had to leave Germany with his wife and three sons, and I had to stay with my mother and two brothers. I was part of his “other family,” which I should explain, since it sheds light on his life and work.

    In 1923 Heinrich Zimmer met and fell in love with Mila Esslinger-Rauch (1886–1972). He considered the relationship the beginning of his “coming into his own,” and he regarded his first book,Kunstform und Yoga im indischen Kultbild(1926), as a fruit of the love...

  6. 2 AN EPITAPH FOR HEINRICH ZIMMER (1948)
    (pp. 21-30)
    Herbert Nette

    LET ME BEGIN my reminiscences of Heinrich Zimmer and his works with a few biographical notes. He was born on December 6, 1890, in Greifswald, the son of the scholar of Indian studies who bore the same name and to whom we are indebted for a definitive portrayal of Vedic culture. The younger Zimmer studied German and comparative philology in Berlin, presenting himself forHabilitationat the university in Greifswald soon after the end of World War I. From 1924 to 1938 he held the chair of Indian philology in Heidelberg, but lost his post there because he was married...

  7. 3 ZIMMER AND THE MELLONS
    (pp. 31-42)
    William McGuire

    MARY AND PAUL MELLON became Jungian analysands, in a manner of speaking, when they began having analytical interviews with Ann and Erlo van Waveren in New York City. That was in 1935, soon after the Mellons’ marriage. While the van Waverens’ credentials as analytical psychologists were obscure (there was no formal training program in those days, and it is difficult to ascertain whether they trained in any sense with either Jung himself or any of his disciples), they had been involved with Olga Froebe-Kapteyn, the founder of the Eranos conferences near Ascona, in the Italian-speaking part of Switzerland. Erlo van...

  8. 4 THE IMPRESS OF DR. JUNG ON MY PROFESSION
    (pp. 43-48)
    Henry R. Zimmer

    THE FIRST teaching which I personally received from Professor Jung, when I first met him at Zurich in 1932, was not an oral one nor was it written. I was taught by the pictorial script of a mere gesture after the famous manner of the masters of Zen Buddhism, who prefer to teach without words by mere gestures and attitudes. In this case it was a gesture of both his hands and in one of them he held a bottle of gin.

    You remember how the outstanding doctrine of Zen Buddhism came into existence. Once, in an assembly of monks,...

  9. 5 THE KING AND THE CORPSE AND THE RABBI AND THE TALK-SHOW STAR: ZIMMER’S LEGACY TO MYTHOLOGISTS AND INDOLOGISTS
    (pp. 49-60)
    Wendy Doniger

    THE MULTIPLICITY of the cast embedded in my title expresses my perception of the multiplicity of our debt to Heinrich Zimmer. And by “our” debt I mean two groups: Indologists, symbolized by the king and the corpse, the loosely translated title of a Sanskrit text that Zimmer wrote about; and historians of religion, more precisely mythologists, symbolized by the rabbi (in a story by Martin Buber that Zimmer cited, and with which we shall conclude) and the talk-show star—Joseph Campbell, who was Zimmer’s student long before Bill Moyers made “Campbell” a household word for something more than soup.

    I...

  10. 6 HEINRICH AND HENRY R. ZIMMER: THE TRANSLATOR TRANSLATED
    (pp. 61-86)
    Gerald Chapple

    THERE ARE MANY Heinrich Robert Zimmers: the scholar of Indian philosophy, religion and art, as well as the philologist, mythologist, psychologist, translator and fabulatorextraordinaire. We can add two more: a pre-1940, “German” Zimmer, and a post-1940, “American” Zimmer whose fame in the English-speaking world rests almost entirely on the four volumes Joseph Campbell produced for the Bollingen Series. Fortunately, for my purposes, Zimmer changed his name to fit his conscious and wholehearted embrace of his new country. “Henry R. Zimmer” became his professional name; he signed his publications with it and was so called in his obituary in the...

  11. 7 MAGIC, MYTH, MYSTICISM, AND MEDICINE
    (pp. 87-104)
    Kenneth G. Zysk

    INDOLOGISTS have generally shied away from close examination of the indigenous healing tradition, considering it either too specialized or too far afield from their central interests. Those few explorers who have ventured into these uncharted lands were and are often unusually innovative thinkers and scholars who share the common objective of a comprehensive understanding of India’s cultural and intellectual heritage. One of these was Heinrich Zimmer, the father of the subject of this essay. Zimmerpèrewas a scholar of Celtic lore as well as an Indologist; his chapter “Heilkunde” in hisAltindisches Leben(Berlin, 1879) remains an excellent brief...

  12. 8 SCHOPENHAUER’S SHAKTI
    (pp. 105-118)
    Matthew Kapstein

    THE REFLECTIONS that follow are offered in response to the suggestion of my friend and colleague John Hawley, who, as organizer of the Zimmer centenary colloquium at Columbia University, asked that I provide an assessment of Heinrich Zimmer’s contribution to the study of Indian philosophy. To do so is something of a challenge, for Zimmer’s is not a name often invoked in connection with the contemporary study of Indian philosophy. And for good reason. Zimmer was no philosopher, and never identified himself as one. Nonetheless, his bookPhilosophies of Indiahas enjoyed long popularity and, in the public imagination at...

  13. 9 ZIMMER AND COOMARASWAMY: VISIONS AND VISUALIZATIONS
    (pp. 119-142)
    Mary F. Linda

    The Art of Indian Asiais accepted as Heinrich Zimmer’s exegesis of the Buddhist and Hindu art of South and Southeast Asia. Edited by Joseph Campbell from lecture notes prepared by Zimmer at Columbia University in 1941 and from earlier notes, the text, with an accompanying volume of plates, was published in 1955, twelve years after Zimmer’s death.¹ It was intended by the publishers to serve as an introduction to Indian art, rather than a chronological, historical account of its development. Zimmer would doubtless have approved of this intent, for none of his writings extensively address the relevance of chronology...

  14. List of Contributors
    (pp. 143-144)
  15. INDEX
    (pp. 145-148)