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Pound's Cavalcanti

Pound's Cavalcanti: An Edition of the Translation, Notes, and Essays

David Anderson
Copyright Date: 1983
Pages: 336
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zvcb2
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  • Book Info
    Pound's Cavalcanti
    Book Description:

    This book makes available the entire range of Ezra Pounds studies and translations of the technically complex philosophical poems of the thirteenth-century Florentine Guido Cavalcanti, DanteÕs first friend" and artistic rival.

    Originally published in 1983.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-5313-7
    Subjects: Language & Literature, History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION
    (pp. ix-xxx)

    Pound often avoided using the verb “to translate,” preferring a calque such as “to bring over” that recalls the etymology of the conventional term. When his first translation of Cavalcanti’s “Donna mi prega” appeared inThe Dialin 1928, he called it a “traduction,” replacing the usual word with a Latinism derived ultimately fromtraductio,“a leading across.” Such restless attention to the term betrays impatience with the conventional limits of the activity it names, and in fact Pound was a theorist who insisted that “bringing over” a poem could take many different routes, from new composition in the style...

  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xxxi-2)
  6. FOREWORDS AND PREFACES
    (pp. 3-10)

    We can be sure that Pound would want the “Introduction” fromSonnets and Ballate(1912) to precede his Cavalcanti translations in this or any other reissue of them, for that was his editorial policy in 1912, 1929, 1953, and 1966. For the projected “Complete Works” of 1929, forRimein 1932, and for the deluxe edition of the translations printed in 1966, he wrote short prefaces to the earlier “Introduction” and it seems best to begin the present edition with a review of these. Thereafter, the sequence of parts follows more or less naturally, with the “Introduction” leading to the...

  7. THE “INTRODUCTION” TO SONNETS AND BALLATE
    (pp. 11-20)

    Even the qualification in the last line of this speech which Oderesi, honour of Agobbio, illuminator of fair pages, makes to Dante in the terrace for the purgation of Pride, must be balanced by Dante’s reply to Guido’s father among the burning tombs (InfernoX), sic.

    Cavalcante de’ Cavalcanti:

    If by the height of genius thou dost go Through this blind prison house; where is my son? Why is he not with thee?

    Dante:

    I come not of myself, But he, who awaiteth there (Virgil) doth lead me through.

    After these passages from theCommediathere should be small need...

  8. THE TRANSLATIONS
    (pp. 21-182)
  9. APPENDIX I: FOUR SHORT POEMS
    (pp. 183-192)
  10. APPENDIX II: OTHER CANZONI
    (pp. 193-202)
  11. CAVALCANTI [1934 Make It New]
    (pp. 203-252)

    Apart from the welcome given to or withheld from a fine performance, it seems to me that the vogue of Guido’s canzone,Donna mi prega,was due to causes not instantly apparent to the modern reader. I mean that it shows traces of a tone of thought no longer considered dangerous, but that may have appeared about as soothing to the Florentine of A.D. 1290 as conversation about Tom Paine, Marx, Lenin and Bucharin would to-day in a Methodist bankers’ board meeting in Memphis, Tenn.

    The teaching of Aristotle had been banned in the University of Paris in 1213. This...

  12. “NOTES” FROM “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF GUIDO CAVALCANTI”
    (pp. 253-276)
  13. “The Text and Its Tradition” and Other Essays from “The Complete Works of Guido Cavalcanti”
    (pp. 277-288)

    In 1527 Di Giunta printed the first text of Guido:Sonetti e Canzoni di diversi antichi autori Toscani,¹ the sixth book of which is headed: “Sonetti e Ballate di Guido di Messer Cavalcante Cavalcanti.” This text is so good that, wherever I have departed from it, I have given Di Giunta’s readings in marginal gloze. The volume was reprinted in Venice in 1532.² In [the MS.] Magliabechiana VII. 1108, now in the Biblioteca Nazionale, Firenze, and known as MS. Ma. one sees the early commentator struggling with a comparison of texts. This manuscript is supposed to have been used by...

  14. INDEX OF FIRST LINES IN CAVALCANTI’S RIME
    (pp. 289-290)
  15. SUBJECT INDEX TO THE PROSE AND COMMENTARY
    (pp. 291-298)
  16. Back Matter
    (pp. 299-299)