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Princetonians, 1791-1794: A Biographical Dictionary

Princetonians, 1791-1794: A Biographical Dictionary

J. JEFFERSON LOONEY
RUTH L. WOODWARD
Copyright Date: 1991
Pages: 642
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zvcrv
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  • Book Info
    Princetonians, 1791-1794: A Biographical Dictionary
    Book Description:

    These volumes, the fourth and fifth, complete the series of biographical sketches of students at Princeton University (the College of New Jersey in colonial times). They cover pivotal years for both the nation and the College. In 1784, the war with England had just ended. Nassau Hall was still in a shambles following its bombardment, and the College was in financial distress. It gradually regained financial and academic strength, and the Class of 1794 graduated in the year of the death of President John Witherspoon, one of the most important early American educators.

    The introductory essay by John Murrin, editor of the series since 1981, explores the postwar context of the College. The two volumes contain biographies of 354 men who attended with the classes of 1784 through 1794 and two other students whose presence at the College in earlier years has only now been demonstrated. During these years Princeton accounted for about an eighth of all A.B. degrees granted in the United States. It was the young republic's most "national" college, although it had nearly lost its New England constituency and was instead beginning to draw nearly 40 percent of its students from the South.

    Originally published in 1991.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-6127-9
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-viii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-x)
  3. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. xi-xii)
  4. PREFACE
    (pp. xiii-xvi)
    John M. Murrin
  5. INTRODUCTION: Princetonians, 1784—1794
    (pp. xvii-lviii)
    JOHN M. MURRIN

    Even after the American War for Independence ended victoriously in 1783, the Revolution continued its profound impact upon the lives of Princetonians. It affected everything from the physical condition of the College to the size of the faculty, the regional balance of the student body, the career choices of alumni, and—most vividly—the memories and experiences that both students and faculty brought with them.

    The significance of American independence saturated undergraduate oratory, especially when the French Revolution convinced many onlookers that what had started in Britain’s distant colonies was about to sweep across the entire world. Liberty, declared Nathaniel...

  6. ABBREVIATIONS AND SHORT TITLES FREQUENTLY USED
    (pp. lix-lxiv)
  7. CLASS OF 1791
    (pp. 1-128)

    David Barclay, A.B., A.M. 1800, Presbyterian clergyman, was born on May 9, 1770, the youngest of the three sons and two daughters of Charles and Catherine Gordon Barclay. The father operated a farm two miles from Cranbury, Middlesex County, New Jersey. He was the grandson of John Barclay, who emigrated from Scotland to Perth Amboy around 1682, and in 1687 was deeded a proprietorship of East Jersey by his brother Robert, the absentee governor and renowned Quaker apologist. Despite his Quaker heritage and his grandfather’s Anglicanism, Charles Barclay was a leading member of the Presbyterian Church of Cranbury. His wife...

  8. CLASS OF 1792
    (pp. 129-248)

    Joseph McKnitt Alexander, Jr., A.B., physician, was the son of Jane Bane and John McKnitt Alexander of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. After serving an apprenticeship to a tailor, twenty-one year old John McKnitt Alexander migrated to Mecklenburg from Cecil County, Maryland, bringing with him some ready-made clothes and a supply of broadcloth. He prospered as a tailor, later becoming a surveyor and acquiring extensive land holdings. By 1790 he was the largest slave owner in his district of the county. His son Joseph was born April 28, 1774 at the family home, “Independence Hill,” which was located near Clark’s Creek,...

  9. CLASS OF 1793
    (pp. 249-324)

    Archer makes his only appearance in the College sources on a class list for the summer session of 1792, when he was a junior. Without his first name or an address, no positive identification has been possible, but if a relationship to other Princetonians with the surname is assumed, then several strong candidates from Virginia and Maryland emerge. Making a positive identification seems unjustified in the absence of further evidence.

    Sources: Min. Fac., class list ca. May 1792.

    An Edward Archer from Virginia received his A.B. from the College in 1795. Edward has not been positively identified, but a likely...

  10. CLASS OF 1794
    (pp. 325-468)

    William Bay, M.D. Columbia 1797, physician, was born on October 14, 1773 in Albany, New York, the second of six children of John Bay (A.B. 1765) and his wife Ann Williams Bay. Of Huguenot ancestry, the father was a prosperous lawyer who supported the Revolution and later was active politically as an Antifederalist and Republican. By 1781 he had moved his family to a large estate at Claverack, a community that was set off from Albany to Columbia County in 1786. Probably he had already moved there by June 1779 when his daughter Maria became one of the charter students...

  11. APPENDIX A: SKETCHES OMITTED FROM PREVIOUS VOLUMES
    (pp. 469-488)
  12. APPENDIX Β: THE MASTER’S DEGREE: A NOTE TO READERS
    (pp. 489-490)
    J. JEFFERSON LOONEY
  13. APPENDIX C: GEOGRAPHICAL AND OCCUPATIONAL LISTINGS
    (pp. 491-500)
  14. APPENDIX D: ERRATA AND ADDITIONS FOR FIRST THREE VOLUMES
    (pp. 501-506)
  15. INDEX
    (pp. 507-577)