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Muslims Under Latin Rule, 1100-1300

Muslims Under Latin Rule, 1100-1300

James M. Powell Editor
Copyright Date: 1990
Pages: 230
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zvz96
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    Muslims Under Latin Rule, 1100-1300
    Book Description:

    Covering Portugal and Castile in the West to the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem in the East, this collection focuses on Muslim minorities living in Christian lands during the high Middle Ages, and examines to what extent notions of religious tolerance influenced Muslim-Christian relations. The authors call into question the applicability of modern ideas of toleration to medieval social relations, investigating the situation instead from the standpoint of human experience within the two religious cultures. Whereas this study offers no evidence of an evolution of coherent policy concerning treatment of minorities in these Christian domains, it does reveal how religious ideas and communitarian traditions worked together to blunt the harsh realities of the relations between victors and vanquished.

    The chapters in this volume include "The Mudejars of Castile and Portugal in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries" by Joseph F. O'Callaghan, "Muslims in the Thirteenth-Century Realms of Aragon: Interactions and Reaction" by Robert I. Burns, S.J., "The End of Muslim Sicily" by David S. H. Abulafia, "The Subjected Muslims of the Frankish Levant" by Benjamin Z. Kedar, and "The Papacy and the Muslim Frontier" by James M. Powell.

    Originally published in 1990.

    ThePrinceton Legacy Libraryuses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    eISBN: 978-1-4008-6119-4
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. vii-2)
  4. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 3-10)
    James M. Powell

    The inception of this volume goes back to a session at the meeting of the American Historical Association in December 1985, devoted to “Medieval Mediterranean Society in Comparative Perspective,” in which all of the contributors participated. The focus on Muslims under Latin rule in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries emerged from the papers and comments at that session. However, the essays here go well beyond the beginnings made in the session. It is to the credit of the contributors that they have remained faithful to the format outlined at that time.

    The essays presented here do not include all facets...

  5. 1 THE MUDEJARS OF CASTILE AND PORTUGAL IN THE TWELFTH AND THIRTEENTH CENTURIES
    (pp. 11-56)
    Joseph F. O’Callaghan

    Ever since francisco Fernández y González published his study of the social and political condition of the Mudejars of Castile in the late nineteenth century, scarcely any new work has focused attention on this theme. To be sure, Isidro de las Cagigas published a study of the Mudejars as a religio-ethnic minority in 1948–1949, but his emphasis was essentially upon the progress of the reconquest and he did not significantly expand our knowledge. More recently, Miguel Ángel Ladero Quesada studied the Mudejars at the close of the Middle Ages and published a collection of documents illustrating their status during...

  6. 2 MUSLIMS IN THE THIRTEENTH-CENTURY REALMS OF ARAGON: INTERACTION AND REACTION
    (pp. 57-102)
    Robert I. Burns

    European mediterranean societies in the high Middle Ages were frontier societies.¹ They lived in conjunction to, and interacted with, their Muslim neighbors. European and Islamic cultures interpenetrated each other in a number of ways, from interchange of slave populations and commercial guest-communities to military and technological influences. A third society was present at every level of this interchange and integration: the Jewish communities within both Islam and Christendom, many of whose members moved as well between the two. At a more profound level both European and Islamic cultures had much in common from their Hellenistic and Judaic inheritance.

    In both...

  7. 3 THE END OF MUSLIM SICILY
    (pp. 103-134)
    David S. H. Abulafia

    The kingdom of sicily has long been characterized as an island of tolerance; the harmonious coexistence of Greek and Latin, Jew and Muslim is said to be symbolized by the unashamed mixing of Byzantine, Romanesque, and Arabic styles in King Roger II’sCappella Palatina,or by Frederick II’s correspondence with Muslim scholars and his patronage of Jewish translators.¹ Yet this is only to speak of the royal court, and of the kingdom without its mainland half. There, despite some settlement in the late Byzantine period, few Muslims could be found until Frederick II emptied the island of Sicily of its...

  8. 4 THE SUBJECTED MUSLIMS OF THE FRANKISH LEVANT
    (pp. 135-174)
    Benjamin Z. Kedar

    The phase of latin rule over subjected Muslims had a different long-term significance in the western and central Mediterranean on the one hand and in the Levant on the other. In the Iberian peninsula and Sicily, the Latin conquest ushered in the crucial stage in the history of the local Muslims at the end of which they were to disappear completely. By comparison, Frankish rule over Levantine Muslims constituted a relatively brief episode, which ended in Muslim triumph and the total eradication of the Frankish population.

    At most this episode may be considered to have lasted from the conquest of...

  9. 5 THE PAPACY AND THE MUSLIM FRONTIER
    (pp. 175-204)
    James M. Powell

    In the debate over the medieval frontier, the role of the papacy has been peripheral to broader questions regarding the impact of the frontier on expanding Western societies. Even in the discussions of those churches that were at the borders of Western Christendom, there is often little recognition that the popes faced distinctive problems. Works such as Peter Linehan’sSpanish Church and the Papacy,Josef Déer’sPapsttum una Normannen,Jean Decarreaux’sNormands, popes et moines,and Kenneth Setton’s massivePapacy and the Levantdevote little space to these issues.¹ James Muldoon has explored the development of canon law regarding the...

  10. CONCLUSIONS A COMPARATIVE NOTE
    (pp. 205-208)
    James M. Powell

    By the end of the thirteenth century, Latin rule in the kingdom of Acre had drawn to a close. In southern Italy, the Muslims of Lucera had been dispersed; in Sicily only remnants of the earlier Muslim communities survived. Only in Spain, particularly in Valencia, did Muslims continue to dwell in substantial numbers under Christian rule. For those who remained, there were increased pressures toward conversion and restrictions on public prayer, particularly of the muezzin’s summons. Slavery and the slave trade assumed a somewhat greater importance as a means of providing household servants and agricultural labor, as indigenous communities of...

  11. NOTES ON THE CONTRIBUTORS
    (pp. 209-210)
  12. INDEX
    (pp. 211-222)