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Latino Politics en Ciencia Poltica

Latino Politics en Ciencia Poltica: The Search for Latino Identity and Racial Consciousness

Tony Affigne
Evelyn Hu-DeHart
Marion Orr
Foreword by John A. García
Copyright Date: 2014
Published by: NYU Press
Pages: 320
https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt9qfpcn
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  • Book Info
    Latino Politics en Ciencia Poltica
    Book Description:

    More than 53 million Latinos now constitute the largest, fastest-growing, and most diverse minority group in the United States, and the nation's political future may well be shaped by Latinos' continuing political incorporation. In the 2012 election, Latinos proved to be a critical voting bloc in both Presidential and Congressional races; this demographic will only become more important in future American elections. Using new evidence from the largest-ever scientific survey addressed exclusively to Latino/Hispanic respondents,Latino Politicsen Ciencia Politicaexplores political diversity within the Latino community, considering how intra-community differences influence political behavior and policy preferences.The editors and contributors, all noted scholars of race and politics, examine key issues of Latino politics in the contemporary United States: Latino/a identities (latinidad), transnationalism, acculturation, political community, and racial consciousness. The book contextualizes today's research within the history of Latino political studies, from the field's beginnings to the present, explaining how systematic analysis of Latino political behavior has over time become integral to the study of political science.Latino Politicsen Ciencia Politica is thus an ideal text for learning both the state of the field today, and key dimensions of Latino political attitudes.

    eISBN: 978-0-8147-7131-0
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. List of Tables
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. List of Figures
    (pp. xi-xii)
  5. List of Chapter Appendices
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  6. Foreword: Latino People, Politics, Communities, and Knowledge
    (pp. xv-xx)
    JOHN A. GARCÍA

    “How do you hold a moonbeam in your hand?” Although I am one who finds himself using musical metaphors far too often for others’ tastes, the elusiveness and complexities involved in the examination of, and the directing of systematic queries and analyses about, political behavior in the Latino communities make it a daunting challenge, one that I have been pursuing for over forty years. Given my strong personal ties, I am privileged to have the opportunity to add a foreword to this collection of research pieces, based on the Latino National Survey and its New England spin-off. In this foreword,...

  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xxi-xxii)
  8. Introduction
    (pp. 1-6)
    TONY AFFIGNE, EVELYN HU-DEHART and MARION ORR

    This book is a truly collaborative effort, allowing the final whole to be more than the sum of its initial parts. In a continuing spirit of cooperation, we now offer this book to scholars, students, policymakers, and community leaders, toward a better understanding of Latinos, in our nation’s rapidly evolving plural society.

    Our collection of original essays culminates the Latino National Survey–New England Extension project, which was generously funded by the Rhode Island Foundation. The book consists primarily of research papers first presented at our “National Conference on Latino Politics, Power, and Policy” held at Brown University in Providence,...

  9. PART I: LATINO POLITICAL STUDIES

    • 1 The Latino Voice in Political Analysis, 1970–2014: From Exclusion to Empowerment
      (pp. 9-48)
      TONY AFFIGNE

      Just before winning reelection in 2012, President Barack Obama, the nation’s first-ever African American president, told an Iowa newspaper that “a big reason” he expected to win a second term was his strong support among the nation’s growing and politically energized Latino electorate.² As it turns out, President Obama was correct. With victories in key states that year (for example, in Colorado, New Mexico, Florida, and Nevada), Obama did owe his reelection, at least in part, to extraordinary support among Latino voters.

      In fact, the Latino Decisions research group reported that an unprecedented 75% of Latino voters had cast ballots...

  10. PART II: LATINIDAD:: THE QUESTION OF “LATINO” IDENTITY

    • 2 Identity Revisited: Latinos(as) and Panethnicity
      (pp. 51-73)
      JESSICA LAVARIEGA MONFORTI

      Scholars have defined panethnic identity as a collective-generated identity that transcends the boundaries of the individual identities of different Spanish-speaking populations and represents a distinct, separate group identification and consciousness (Padilla 1985).² Panethnic Latino identity emerged as the set of Spanish speaking and origin populations grew in size, became closer in residential proximity, and had shared interests (García 2003). The goal of the proposed study is to determine the processes involved in the development of panethnic Latino identities today and to compare these results to a baseline that was set using the Latino National Political Survey (LNPS; 1989–90).

      In...

    • 3 Latino Immigrant Transnational Ties: Who Has Them, and Why Do They Matter?
      (pp. 74-91)
      SARAH ALLEN GERSHON and ADRIAN D. PANTOJA

      The surge in immigration to the United States since the 1965 Immigration Act has heightened interest and research exploring the factors fostering and/or impeding immigrant political incorporation, with much of it focusing on Latinos, the largest group making up the contemporary immigration wave. Increasingly, statistically oriented researchers are examining the consequences of transnational ties on immigrant political incorporation (e.g., Staton, Jackson, and Canache 2007; Cain and Doherty 2006; Pantoja 2005). In this study, we add to this growing literature by examiningwhohas transnational ties among contemporary Latino immigrants andwhythey matter, through the use of survey data from...

    • 4 Multiple Paths to Cynicism: Social Networks, Identity, and Linked Fate among Latinos
      (pp. 92-112)
      JESSICA LAVARIEGA MONFORTI and MELISSA R. MICHELSON

      Scholars and students have wondered for some time about causes and consequences of Americans’ trust in government, generally understood as “a basic evaluative orientation toward the government founded on how well the government is operating according to people’s normative expectations” (Hetherington 1998, 791).¹ In survey research, we measure the prevalence of this attitude—political trust—by asking population samples, “How much of the time do you trust the government to do what is right—just about always, most of the time, some of the time, or never?” Using this concept, we have learned that calculating levels of trust in government...

  11. PART III: ACCULTURATION, DIFFERENTIATION, AND POLITICAL COMMUNITY

    • 5 ¿Quién Apoya Qué? The Influence of Acculturation and Political Knowledge on Latino Policy Attitudes
      (pp. 115-131)
      REGINA BRANTON, ANA FRANCO and ROBERT WRINKLE

      Latinos are the largest and fastest-growing minority group in the nation. This dramatic change in the demographic makeup of the United States underscores the need to understand the political attitudes and behavior of the Latino community. The potential impact of Latinos on U.S. politics depends on the existence of unified attitudes. However, there is a great deal of variation among Latinos in terms of nativity, acculturation, and national origin. These variations lead to differences in attitudes toward public policies.

      Latino public opinion research has largely focused on immigration or ethnicrelated issues. Determining both common and distinctive predictors of Latino preferences...

    • 6 The Boundaries of Americanness: Perceived Barriers among Latino Subgroups
      (pp. 132-158)
      HEATHER SILBER MOHAMED

      From the Founding Fathers to the present day, the meaning of “American” is frequently conceptualized around ideology. Discussions of liberalism (Hartz 1950), the American “dream” (Hochschild 1995), and the American creed (Huntington 1981; Myrdal 1944) emphasize the centrality of ideological pursuits such as individualism and democracy to the character of the United States.

      Yet, throughout history, more ascriptive, limited definitions of what it means to be American have also persisted. Particularly during periods of demographic and other change, “nativists” have frequently sought to redefine what it means to be American on the basis of religious, racial, and other restrictive grounds...

  12. PART IV: NEGRURA, LINKED FATE, AND INTERMINORITY RELATIONS

    • 7 Black and Latino Coalition Formation in New England: Perceptions of Cross-Racial Commonality
      (pp. 161-183)
      MARION ORR, DOMINGO MOREL and KATRINA GAMBLE

      While Latinos have experienced significant population growth in recent decades, they remain a numerical and political minority, which means if they are to leverage their growing power, they must build viable coalitions with other racial and ethnic groups. One area that requires further study is cross-racial coalition building between Blacks and Latinos under this new political and demographic dynamic. Given the changes in racial demographics and the diversity of the Latino community in New England, we believe it is important to better understand Black-Latino relations in this region (Filindra and Orr 2013; Orr and West 2007). Most research on African...

    • 8 Racial Identities and Latino Public Opinion: Racial Self-Image and Policy Preferences among Latinos
      (pp. 184-205)
      ATIYA KAI STOKES-BROWN

      A number of scholars have explored Latino attitudes about public policies (e.g., de la Garza et al. 1993; Hood. Morris, and Shirkey 1997; Sanchez 2006; Branton 2007), yet few of them have explored the relationship between Latinos’ policy attitudes and theirracialidentities. I hypothesize that because race is central in determining the life chances and social positions of groups in the United States, social and economic differences among Latino racial groups may create distinct policy attitudes among these groups. Thus, it is expected that feelings of closeness and commonality (due to similar social and economic positions) may lead to...

    • 9 A “Southern Exception” in Black-Latino Attitudes? Perceptions of Competition with African Americans and Other Latinos
      (pp. 206-228)
      MATT A. BARRETO and GABRIEL R. SANCHEZ

      Recent dramatic growth in Latino populations across the United States has captured the interest of academics and political observers, with special attention to the movement of Latinos, and particularly Latino immigrants, into regions of the country previously not associated with this population. In 1990, for example, Hispanics accounted for less than 2% of the population in twenty-two states (Garcia and Sanchez 2008). By 2000, however, there were only eleven states in which Hispanics constituted only 2% or less of the population, and Hispanics are now found in numbers above 1,000 in every one of the fifty states. This demographic shift...

  13. PART V: CONCLUSION

    • 10 Latino Politics and Power in the Twenty-First Century: Insights from Political Analysis
      (pp. 231-244)
      MANNY AVALOS and TONY AFFIGNE

      When clear winter skies rise over New England—more than 2,000 miles from the Rio Grande River—the sun’s pale rays illumine richly colored images of La Virgen de Guadalupe in thousands of Mexican American homes, in cities like Bridgeport, Hartford, Providence, Worcester, and Boston. In fact, by the time of the 2010 Census, several thousand Mexican American people could be found as far into the northeast as Bangor, Maine—the easternmost city in the United States.¹ Maine is not unique; in the first years of the twenty-first century, the nation’s Latino² population has grown to more than 53 million...

  14. Appendix A: Latino National Survey Questionnaire (LNS/LNS-NE, 2005–2008)
    (pp. 245-254)
  15. Appendix B: Latino National Survey Questionnaire (en Español)
    (pp. 255-288)
  16. About the Contributors
    (pp. 289-292)
  17. Index
    (pp. 293-298)